Sensory Experiences Increase In-Store Sales by 10 Percent, Finds New Research from Mood Media

Behavioral study conducted by Walnut Unlimited for Mood Media and global sports retailer INTERSPORT confirms that sensory marketing has a positive emotional, cognitive and behavioral impact on shoppers

 

Mood Media today released a new quantitative behavioral marketing study, “Quantifying the Impact of Sensory Marketing,” which proves that sensory marketing has positive emotional, cognitive and behavioral impacts on shoppers in-store. In this study, Mood Media partnered with its international sports retailer client, INTERSPORT, to conduct a controlled experiment that found when sensory marketing was applied, sales increased by 10 percent. Also highly noteworthy, shoppers spent almost six minutes longer in-store when the senses were activated.

 

“Knowing that 78% of shoppers say an enjoyable atmosphere plays a key factor in purchasing a product in-store versus online, we partnered with Walnut Unlimited to develop unique behavioral and neuromarketing quantitative research that demonstrates how shoppers react first-hand to specific sensory experiences,” said Scott Moore, Global CMO of Mood Media. “The results speak for themselves. A strategic top-level approach to incorporating in-store sensorial elements creates a measurable emotional response with consumers that delivers bottom-line results.”

 

Additional key findings showcasing the positive impact of in-store sensorial stimuli include:

  • Shoppers purchased more items (increase of 4 percent) – and higher priced items (increase of 6 percent in value) – when sensorial marketing elements were in place.
  • The use of scent is even more impactful when being used to highlight a specific department or zone. In the scented football zone, customers’ emotional levels were elevated by 28 percent compared to the baseline.
  • From the installation of scent in the football area to-date, INTERSPORT has noticed a 26 percent increase in sales in the category in the test store compared to the same category performance in all the other stores throughout the country.
  • Based on Eye Tracking (ET) metrics, awareness of digital screens in-store increased by 5 percent when moving visualizations were activated on-screen (vs. static images).
  • Based on Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) metrics, a lack of sensorial elements in-store caused many consumers to become awkwardly self-aware while shopping, with 17 percent becoming more emotionally sensitive and uncomfortable in an unusually quiet and stimulant-free environment.
  • Consumers like seeing themselves, which the study describes as “the science of narcissism.” Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) and Eye Tracking (ET) metrics showed a significant increase in nervous system activity and engagement when consumers saw themselves in mirrors and interacted with products in front of mirrors.
  • Shoppers showed a 50 percent emotional increase when touching and engaging with a product. This supports first-hand the important and unique role that in-store shopping continues to serve.

 

“As we build our omnichannel strategy, we continue to focus on enhancing our brick & mortar stores with memorable and engaging experiences that connect with our customer base,” said Chris Kleine, Director Design and Development from IIC-INTERSPORT Intl Corp. “The involvement of our national licensee in this research has further highlighted how important sensory experiences are in creating a positive in-store environment that brings shoppers back time and time again.”

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